Fishbowl Adviser

10 Best Algae Eaters for Your Aquarium

Best Algae Eaters

Are you struggling with an algae infestation that started to disturb the healthy environment in your aquarium? Then getting some of the best algae eaters can be a solution. These animals can significantly reduce the amount of work that you have to do in order to keep your tank perfectly functioning and clean. Read on to find out more about some of the fish, snails, and shrimp that can be fantastic prevention for algae infestation or an ideal aid for the already problematic aquarium.

Siamese Algae Eater

Siamese Algae Eater

If you found out that Blackbeard alga (or BBA) is ruining the safe environment for your fish during your regular aquarium maintenance, then getting a siamese algae eater can solve your problem. This plain-looking, peaceful, and quiet fish is actually an incredibly good algae eater. There are many varieties of this fish that are visible as they get older. They require a larger, planted tank with a bit of current because they’re fast and active. If you can, get a group of them. Keep in mind that they don’t eat algae their whole life. As soon as they grow up to around three inches, they stop eating the algae, which makes them a part-time solution.

Molly Fish

Molly Fish

One of the ways of learning how to control aquarium algae is to get molly fish. They aren’t usually the first choice for someone looking for an algae eater, but black mollies do an incredible job. If you’ve got a cloudy tank or some other algae infestation, molly fish can keep it tidy. They are omnivorous, which implies that you can feed them with any kind of food, but they’ll also nibble on the algae that have showed up in your aquarium. Mollies adapt quickly, so you won’t have to bother figuring out how to acclimate new fish to your tank. Just keep them in an aquarium big enough for them and their fry if you plan to breed them, and you’ll have a beautiful and beneficial addition to your tank.

Twig Catfish

Twig Catfish

Although they’re amazing for your algae problem, twig catfish aren’t recommended if you’re a beginner in this hobby and you still aren’t sure how to adjust pH in your aquarium. These fish require specialized care, and they’re very sensitive to water conditions. Also, they can’t be kept with species that can be aggressive to them. Make sure that your twig catfish are accompanied by timid fish in a planted tank with many hiding places. They will show their gratitude by eating most types of algae, but remember to feed them with more than that. Their diet should also contain some vegetables and prepared food.

Mystery Snail

If you wish to get rid of all the algae from your substrate, glass, and plants, getting some mystery snails is a fantastic idea. They come in a variety of colors, but yellow is the most common one. These snails are amazing algae eaters, but there’s one downside – they eat a lot. You will see them feeding on fish food pellets, fresh or frozen foods, and they might even eat your aquarium plants. It’s also not uncommon to see them eating dead fish. These snails can grow to the size of a baseball, which is when they can fend for themselves. As long as they’re small, they can be prey for bigger predators in your tank.

Amano Shrimp

Amano Shrimp

Looking for an easy solution for an algae-infested tank? Three or four Amano shrimps are enough to solve your problem. They’re active eaters which means that they’ll search for food around the tank. While eating edible plants, fish food flakes, or vegetables, they will also work on cleaning your plants, rocks, and substrate from algae. This means that they have a double benefit – Amano shrimps will eliminate the existing algae and eat the leftovers of aquarium fish food that would eventually decompose and create food for algae. Keep them away from predatory fish such as Goldfish. Amano shrimps will do best in a freshwater tank with other snails and shrimps.

Cherry Shrimp

Cherry Shrimp

Named after their bright red color, cherry shrimp are a beautiful and beneficial addition to your tank with algae. They will eat soft green and brown algae, along with other fish food such as flakes and pellets. They can populate easily and you can breed them, but they only live for about a year. They won’t eat a lot of algae, but they’re amazing for maintenance because they’re pretty much self-sufficient. They will go through the gravel and pick up all little morsels of food that break down creating nitrate, phosphates, and all other algae food. That way, they take from the algae the necessary stuff that they need to grow, preventing the infestation.

Nerite Snail

Nerite Snail

These efficient algae eaters can be recognized instantly for their zebra-patterned shells. Two or three of them will be perfect for getting rid of green spot algae that might grow on wood and plant leaves, but they also feed on other sorts of algae as well. You won’t have to worry about their population since they need saltwater to reproduce. However, when it comes to other water conditions, they’re very tolerable. If you have too many algae in your tank already, you don’t have to add any more supplementation to their diet, but if there’s not enough, add some green vegetables. Nerite snails are very good tank mates, so keep them in a peaceful environment.

Bristlenose Pleco

Bristlenose Pleco

If you noticed that there’s too much nitrate while you were learning about cycling your fish tank, the cause behind that can be algae infestation. Since they feed on nitrates, getting Bristlenose pleco to feed on algae is a great idea. These fish have a wide, flat body with tentacles on their head, and they love to dwell on the bottom. While they search for food, they also clean your substrate. The Bristlenose pleco are very easy to take care of, which makes them perfect for beginners, but make sure you don’t overfeed them. They produce a lot of waste, and it would be best to keep them in a tank that has at least 25 gallons in volume.

Otocinclus Catfish

Otocinclus Catfish

Otocinclus catfish are ideal for nano aquariums since they don’t grow larger than two inches. These tiny catfish are great for eating algae from all of the flat surfaces, and they can get into all the smaller places to clean them as well. They will do a better job if there’s more of them, so consider getting five to ten. Even though they’re pretty easy to keep, they also require stable parameters in water, so they don’t make an ideal pet for beginners. In the wild, oto catfish feed on algae, but in captivity, you can supplement their diet with some frozen bloodworm, spirulina, or vegetables.

Florida Flagfish

This colorful fish is an omnivore, but they can easily solve your problem with algae blooming. It’s one of the few that will eat thread algae, BBA, and other fuzzy types, which makes them your ideal ally. Algae alone aren’t enough for their diet, so add some fish flakes or live food. They’re mostly peaceful and enjoy cooler water where they can move fast. Remember to keep a lid on the tank, since they also love to jump.

Summary

Algae eaters are great for maintaining the algae in your tank at a satisfactory level. Keep in mind that they usually love to eat one or two types of algae, but they won’t touch the rest. This is why it’s recommended to have more than one type of algae eater for your infestation and overgrowth. Depending on which alga has spread in your tank, you can consider getting some of the fish, shrimp, or snails we listed above. It’s also important to consider the size of the tank. If you have a small one, starting with one kind is perfectly fine, but if you have a big tank, getting two types of algae eaters from the start is highly recommended.

Source:

  1. The Algae Eater Debate – INJAF

SHARE:

Related Posts

1 Comment
  1. Reply Avatar
    houston junk car buyer April 25, 2022 at 2:54 pm

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts on appealing articles.

    Thank you for undertaking it and I desire you did not lose the inspiration to write the unique ones!.
    Regards

Leave a reply